"Crisis Of Crimes": New Orleans Becomes Murder Capital Of America

“Crisis Of Crimes”: New Orleans Becomes Murder Capital Of America

Progressives in top city leadership positions have helped transform New Orleans into the murder capital of America. 

WSJ reported the Louisiana city on the Mississippi River, near the Gulf of Mexico, recorded the highest homicide rate of any major city so far this year, with 41 homicides per 100,000 residents. 

Metropolitan Crime Commission Inc., a nonprofit that works on crime-reducing strategies in the city, said the homicide rate is up 141% compared with the same period in 2019. It pointed out carjackings are up 210%, shootings 100%, and armed robberies up 25%.

“The homicide rate is on pace to surpass last year’s rate, which was the worst since Hurricane Katrina in 2005,” WSJ noted. 

The city’s alarming spike in the homicide rate comes at the same time as “progressive prosecutor” Jason Williams became the district attorney of the metro area in early 2021. He promised a “more selective” approach to prosecutions that goes “beyond punishment.”

“Being more selective about prosecutions will allow us to focus on the crimes that matter most to all of us,” Williams said last year, adding, “We’ve got to go beyond punishment and invest in our community.”

Metropolitan Crime Commission recently said Williams’ criminal justice reforms have resulted in a “drastic decline in accountability for violent felony offenders.”

Residents told WSJ an “overwhelmed” police department is a significant factor in the rise in violent crime. 

Ronal Serpas, the city’s police superintendent from 2010-14, said the city has about 50% to 60% of officers needed for adequate patrols. 

“We’re in a crisis of crime and a crisis of confidence in this city,” Serpas said.

Democratic Mayor LaToya Cantrell warned last month Mardi Gras festivities early next year could be canceled because of the police shortage. Local news Times-Picayune said the police department budgets for 1,500 offices, but its force just fell below 1,000 — the lowest level in decades. 

“If we don’t have adequate police, it could mean that there will be no Mardi Gras. That’s a fact,” Cantrell said at a community meeting last month.