Evidence that the coronavirus might have come from the Wuhan Institute of Virology has been in plain sight since the start of the pandemic. Why did Dr. Anthony Fauci, the president’s chief medical adviser, ridicule and dismiss it? Why did mainstream media attack anyone who pointed it out?

There is still much we don’t know about Covid-19. I tried not to be critical of officials forced to make tough decisions with limited, imperfect information. But as new information becomes available, it’s a matter of life and death to integrate what we learn into future policy decisions.

It’s often hard to admit being wrong. When mistakes might have cost a life (or lives), the tendency to justify or cover it up could be overwhelming. In hindsight, I believe many mistakes were made before and during the pandemic. I’m glad the press is finally beginning to investigate the lab origin theory and what role U.S. gain-of-function research might have played. I have many unanswered questions.

Another blunder that I tried to address was federal agencies’ failure to robustly explore and conduct studies on using combinations of repurposed generic drugs in early treatment. One year and almost 600,000 American lives later, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) are finally encouraging trials for a “pill” to reduce viral replication and severity of symptoms. Better late than never, I guess.

What may turn out to be a triumph of historical proportions is Operation Warp Speed and the deployment of an effective vaccine in record time. Based on early data, the vaccines appear to be very effective and safe for the vast majority of people.

But even before the vaccines’ use was authorized, many doctors I consulted were expressing concerns over indiscriminate mass vaccination. They were particularly worried about lack of benefit and hyperactivating responses in individuals previously infected with Covid-19.

I tested positive for Covid-19 in September 2020. I recently had a serology test showing a high level of antibodies. Multiple articles in the NIH’s library and a new Israeli study indicate natural immunity is as or more effective than the vaccine. Thus, the vaccine offers no proven benefit for me and only the chance of harm. Yet pressure to vaccinate everyone, regardless of medical necessity or safety, rapidly increases. Why?

In the United States, the supply of vaccine now exceeds demand. Everyone choosing to be vaccinated can be. Based on current science, their chance of getting infected from a non-vaccinated person is extremely low. It is also becoming apparent that the hype over asymptomatic spread was false — another blow to federal health agency credibility.

As of May 21, the Centers for Disease Control’s Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) reports 4,265 deaths after vaccination, 3,494 within 30 days, and 1,592 on Day 0, 1 or 2. VAERS also shows 14,949 adverse effects resulting in hospitalization. This doesn’t prove causation, but it doesn’t rule it out.

Fauci and others who have a duty to robustly investigate any link to vaccination don’t seem to be taking VAERS seriously. As a result, independent event adjudication and data safety monitoring committees should be established to fully investigate these reports.

There is also growing anecdotal evidence of potential vaccine harm to a minority of previously infected individuals that is hard to ignore. Dr. J. Barton Williams of Tennessee, Christopher Sarmiento of New Mexico, Brandy McFadden of Tennessee, Everest Romney of Utah, and Princess Michael of Kent in the United Kingdom are some publicly reported examples.

Yet the NIH, the Centers for Disease Control, the Food and Drug Administration, and mainstream media seem to be largely ignoring these. Despite the articles and studies referenced above, the FDA inexplicably issued new guidance stating that the presence of antibodies from a Covid-19 infection does not prove immunity. With most viruses, infection leads to immunity. Why would federal agencies’ default assumption with Covid-19 be the exact opposite?

I strongly supported Operation Warp Speed, get an annual flu shot, and am current with other recommended vaccines. But the determined push for indiscriminate vaccination of the previously infected, of pregnant women, and of children causes me to ask questions.

A fundamental of medical ethics is that people have the right to choose or refuse treatment. No one should be pressured, coerced, or fear reprisal for refusing treatment — including the Covid-19 vaccine. Yet colleges are threatening termination for employees and denial of admission for students who choose not to be vaccinated. Other organizations are instituting similar coercion.

Many mistakes were made in how we handled the pandemic. Too often, freedoms have been taken away or, maybe worse, willingly given up, in reaction to the state of fear government officials and media have created. Let’s not compound these mistakes by forcing a successful vaccine on everyone, irrespective of their medical need or condition.

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